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Don’t be ‘Taleban’, don’t turn Kuwait into Gaza

ARE the two authorities – executive and legislative – seeking to habituate Kuwaitis into living in a state of political vacuum, living without executive decision or a legislative body, and settling with wrangling and conflicts that often end in truncated settlements?

Are Kuwaitis required to turn into sects and tribes fighting under false slogans, and racing backwards? Is this Kuwait, which will be a global commercial and financial hub in the year 2035?

What we are experiencing today does not inspire any hope if each team does not retreat from its illusions, and look at reality with insight. The government needs to descend from the tree that it climbed through the game of refusing to sit in the parliamentary chairs, versus the parliamentarians who climbed another tree in a bid to get rid of the two heads of the authorities – the Prime Minister and the Speaker – by paralyzing legislation and slaughtering oversight.

What we are experiencing is pandemonium, as if the two authorities are a group of amateurs, quarreling with a punctured football and leaving the state go with the flow, while this “flow” is now in doubt because sick souls rush to devour carcasses of interests after milking out the state.

In this regard, there are some questions that have become more urgent than ever to be asked – Is there not in the government a “captain” to navigate the ship of the executive authority to safety? Doesn’t the parliament have “pearl traders” who know how to choose the best of “pearls” to administer the legislative institution”? Or did the two parties turn the country into a “Friday market”?

Since the elections to this day, the parliament has not held any worthwhile sessions apart from the session concerning the “front-liners reward” deal. This is because the two parties needed it to strengthen their popularity. After that, the two authorities returned to their quadripartite paralysis, and secretly passed deals on more stringent decisions, which contradict the essence of Kuwait’s existence, as a message of cultural and social openness to the Arab world.

This has gone to the extent of the country becoming almost like the Taliban state because of the concessions made to the enemies of joy, freedom stiflers and consciousness killers, who want to make the country live in the tunnels of Gaza, and not come out into the light of the proper international relations in which it was, until recently, the most worthy player in seizing opportunities to raise its status among nations.

The government is for all the people, and is not owned by a president or a minister that it defends fiercely so as not to lose the balance of interests on which it was built.

The National Assembly is a representative of the people, not parties and groups fighting over spoils.

Has the conflict blinded the members of the two authorities to the extent that they do not see the destruction in the aspects of the economy’s decline, social backwardness, and closure? The Gulf openness was once pioneered by Kuwait and had reached the widest extent, but today it has unfortunately been forced to close its doors in line with the desires of a group of fibbers disguised in religious cloak who practice their promiscuity by suffocating the people and weakening the state.

Nonetheless, if you want a healthy Kuwait that is free of the worms that eat its body, the government must have its clear and realistic program, and the statesmen should not be afraid of being grilled, which is a normal thing in all parliaments of the world.

This means they should be the decision-makers in a manner that regains the prestige of the state, which they squandered in their fear of MPs who live on moral intimidation and services.

Indeed, statesmen do not participate in the game of deals and settlements that have failed many countries in the region. All of you in the government and parliament should look at those countries to know where you are taking Kuwait with these reckless adventures … Perhaps then you will learn.

By Ahmed Al-Jarallah

Editor-in-Chief, the Arab Times

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