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Abandoned Kurds turn to Damascus

SYRIAN ARMY PUSHES NORTH IN MAJOR VICTORY FOR ASSAD

In this photo released by the Syrian official news agency SANA, people welcome Syrian troops as they enter the town of Ein Issa, north of Raqqa, Syria, Monday, Oct 14, 2019. Syrian troops moved east from Aleppo province to Raqqa where state media said they had reached Ein Issa. Heavy fighting the previous day there reached a Kurdish-run displaced-person camp that is home to some 12,000 people, including around 1,000 wives and widows of IS fighters and their children. Hundreds are believed to escaped amid the chaos. (SANA via AP)

BEIRUT/ANKARA, Oct 14, (Agencies): Russia-backed Syrian forces wasted no time in taking advantage of an abrupt US retreat from Syria on Monday, deploying deep inside Kurdish-held territory south of the Turkish frontier less than 24 hours after Washington announced a full withdrawal.

Washington’s Kurdish former allies said they invited in the government troops as an “emergency measure” to help fend off an assault by Turkey, launched last week with “a green light” from US President Donald Trump that the Kurds describe as a betrayal.

The Syrian government’s deployment on Monday is a major victory for President Bashar al-Assad and his principal ally Russia, who gained a military foothold across the biggest swathe of the country that had been beyond their grasp. Under their deal with the Kurds, government forces are poised to move into border areas from the town of Manbij in the west to Derik, 400 km (250 miles) to the east.

Syrian state media reported that troops had already entered Tel Tamer, a town on the strategically important M4 highway that runs east-west around 30 km south of the frontier with Turkey. State TV later showed residents welcoming Syrian forces into the town of Ain Issa, which lies on another part of the highway, hundreds of miles away.

An SDF media official said he could not confirm these deployments. Ain Issa commands the northern approaches to Raqqa, former capital of the Islamic State “caliphate”, which Kurdish fighters recaptured from the militants two years ago in one of the biggest victories of a US-led campaign. Much of the M4 lies on the southern edge of territory where Turkey aims to set up a “safe zone” inside Syria.

Turkey said it had seized part of the highway. An official of the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) said clashes were ongoing. The swift Syrian government deployments came as the strategy the United States has pursued in Syria for the past five years crumbled overnight.

Washington announced on Sunday it was abruptly pulling out its entire force of 1,000 troops which had fought alongside Syrian Kurds against Islamic State since 2014. A US official said on Monday a diplomatic team working to help stabilise territory captured from Islamic State. US troops were still on the ground but early phases of their withdrawal had started, the official said.

Two other US officials have told Reuters the bulk of the US pullout could be completed within days. Sunday’s announcement of the US retreat came just a week after Trump said he would shift a small number of troops out of the way near the border, allowing Turkey to attack the Kurds in what Kurdish officials branded a stab in the back.

Thousands of fighters from a Kurdish-led force have died since 2014 fighting against Islamic State in partnership with the United States, a strategy the Trump administration had continued after inheriting it from his predecessor Barack Obama.

Extract
Trump says he aims to extract the United States from “endless” wars in the Middle East, in keeping with his view that Washington cannot be the world’s policeman.

However, he has announced the Syrian retreat even as he has sent thousands of troops on a new deployment to Saudi Arabia. His Syrian policy reversal allowed Turkey to launch a cross-border assault last week that sent tens of thousands of civilians fleeing and the Kurds scrambling to find new friends. “After the Americans abandoned the region and gave the green light for the Turkish attack, we were forced to explore another option, which is talks with Damascus and Moscow to find a way out and thwart these Turkish attacks,” senior Kurdish official Badran Jia Kurd said. Jia Kurd described the new arrangement with Assad’s forces as a “preliminary military agreement”, and said political aspects would be discussed later.

The Kurds have led an autonomous administration across a wide stretch of north and east Syria. Assad aims to restore his government’s authority across all of Syria after more than eight years of war. Another senior Kurdish politician, Aldar Xelil, called the pact with Damascus “an emergency measure”. “The priority now is protecting the border’s security from the Turkish danger,” Xelil said. “We are in contact with the Damascus government to reach common (ground) in the future.” The biggest change for years in the battlefield of the world’s deadliest ongoing war, the developments create a potential new frontline hundreds of kilometres long between forces of Russia and Turkey and their Syrian allies and proxies.

The US exit leaves Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Russia’s Vladimir Putin, along with Assad’s other ally Iran, as Syria’s undisputed foreign power brokers. Russia and Turkey have hammered out a fragile truce for the northwest, the only other part of Syria still beyond Assad’s grip. Both predicted they would avoid conflict as the area where they face each other is now set to spread across the breadth of the country. “There are many rumours at the moment. However, especially through the embassy and with the positive approach of Russia in Kobane, it appears there won’t be any issues,” Erdogan said when asked about the prospect of confrontation with Russia.

Kobane, on the Turkish border, is one of the first Kurdish-held cities where reports emerged of possible government deployment. Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov dismissed the suggestion that Russia could clash with Turkish forces. “We wouldn’t even like to think of that scenario,” he said.

Sanctions
US Republican Senator Lindsey Graham said on Monday that he had spoken with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi about Turkey’s offensive in northern Syria, and that she supported bipartisan sanctions against Ankara. Graham is usually a vocal supporter of Trump, but he has repeatedly publicly condemned Trump’s decision to withdraw US troops from northeastern Syria, which was quickly followed by a Turkish invasion to drive out Kurdish- led forces who have long been Washington’s allies. “Just spoke with Speaker Pelosi regarding congressional action on Turkey’s incursion of Syria,” Graham tweeted.

“Speaker supports bipartisan sanctions against Turkey’s outrages in Syria. She also believes we should show support for Kurdish allies and is concerned about the reemergence of ISIS.” The Turkish assault has drawn widespread international criticism and alarm that it could allow Islamic State fighters in Syria to escape Kurdish-run prisons and regroup. Ankara says it aims to neutralise the Kurdish YPG militia – the leading component of the SDF – which it views as a terrorist group because of its links to Kurdish separatists in Turkey. US Defense Secretary Mike Esper indicated on Sunday that one factor behind the US pullout was that the Kurds aimed to strike a deal with Russia and Syria.

Hours later, the Kurdish-led administration said it had made precisely such a deal. Turkey says it aims to form a “safe zone” in Syria to settle many of the 3.6 million Syrian refugees it is hosting. Erdogan said on Sunday that the operation would extend from Kobane in the west to Hasaka in the east. Turkey’s European allies have criticised the incursion, threatening to impose sanctions.

Erdogan says Turkey will send Syrian refugees to Europe if the EU does not back the offensive. The fighting has raised Western concerns that the Kurds would be unable to keep thousands of Islamic State fighters in jail and tens of thousands of their family members in camps.

The region’s Kurdish-led administration said 785 Islamic State-affiliated foreigners escaped a camp at Ain Issa over the weekend. The British-based war monitor Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, citing sources in the camp, said the number who escaped was smaller, around 100.

Trump, providing no evidence, tweeted on Monday that the Kurds might be releasing Islamic State prisoners deliberately to lure US troops back. Escaped fighters were “easily recaptured by Turkey or European Nations from where many came, but they should move quickly,” Trump said.

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