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4 held over drugs at actor’s home Hoffman’s heroin didn’t have additive

LOS ANGELES, Feb 5, (Agencies): Four people were arrested on Tuesday in connection with drugs found at the home of film star Philip Seymour Hoffman following his death of an apparent heroin overdose, the New York Daily News reported, citing unidentified police sources. The arrests came during a raid on a building in the Chinatown district of Manhattan after police traced the heroin believed to have killed the Oscar-winning actor there, the newspaper reported. A New York City Police Department spokesman told Reuters that officers found narcotics at the building in Chinatown and four people were arrested. He declined to confirm that the arrests were related to Hoffman’s death.

A second police spokesman told Reuters on Tuesday evening that heroin found in Hoffman’s apartment following his death was not cut or mixed with fentanyl, a synthetic narcotic believed by health authorities to be responsible for scores of overdose deaths in recent months. “There was no fentanyl found in the drugs,” the spokesman said. The 46-year-old actor was found unresponsive on the bathroom floor of his Manhattan apartment on Sunday by police responding to an emergency 911 call. Police found Hoffman with a syringe in his arm and recovered plastic bags containing a substance believed to be heroin. Law enforcement sources have told Reuters that he died of an apparent drug overdose. Preliminary results of an autopsy were expected to be released on Wednesday.

Heroin recovered at Oscar-winning actor Philip Seymour Hoffman’s apartment after he was found there dead with a syringe in his arm has tested negative for the powerful additive fentanyl, a police official said.
Samples taken from Hoffman’s Manhattan apartment didn’t contain the potent synthetic morphine, which is added to intensify the high and has been linked to 22 suspected overdose deaths in western Pennsylvania, the official, who wasn’t authorized to talk about the evidence and insisted on anonymity, said Tuesday. Investigators also have determined that the “Capote” star made six ATM transactions for a total of $1,200 inside a supermarket near his home the day before his death, law enforcement officials said Tuesday. They’ve been piecing together his final hours using video surveillance to determine his whereabouts.

Besides the bank records, investigators discovered buprenorphine, a drug used to treat heroin addiction, at Hoffman’s apartment and are examining a computer and two iPads found at the scene for clues, two law enforcement officials said. Actor Philip Seymour Hoffman, who was found dead in his New York apartment on Sunday in an apparent heroin overdose, will be buried in a private funeral service, the late Oscar-winner’s representative said on Tuesday. The statement issued by Hoffman’s publicist, Karen Samfilippo, did not say when the funeral service for family and friends would happen. It said it would take place in New York without specifying if that meant New York City or elsewhere in the state.

A memorial service for the actor is planned for later this month, the statement said. The results of Hoffman’s autopsy are expected to be released on Wednesday, officials in New York City said. Hoffman, 46, who earned an Oscar for his portrayal of author Truman Capote in the 2006 drama “Capote” and was considered one of the most gifted actors of his generation, had battled substance abuse in recent months. He sought treatment last year after more than 20 years of sobriety. Subdued fans laid roses, photographs and beer outside the apartment of Oscar-winning American actor Philip Seymour Hoffman on Tuesday two days after his death from a suspected overdose. The results of an autopsy on the 46-year-old star are expected to be made public as early as Tuesday, but tests have already concluded that Hoffman was in possession of heroin when he died.

The sudden death of the 46-year-old father of three young children, hailed by many as the finest character actor of his generation, has shocked Hollywood and devastated his family. In a career spanning more than 20 years and 50 films, Hoffman mesmerized filmgoers with his portrayal of some of the most repellent and yet electrifying characters of the silver screen. “Your ‘Death of a Salesman’ was the most magical night I’ve had at the theater. Rest in peace,” said an anonymous, handwritten note laid with a white rose on the step of his New York building. Hoffman was nominated for his third Tony Award for his portrayal of Willy Loman, the main character in American playwright Arthur Miller’s work which he performed on Broadway in 2012.

But heroin never really disappeared. It surfaces in waves, with the latest one driving up overdose deaths and worrying government officials. Fueled by a crackdown on prescription pain killers and an abundant supply of cheap heroin that’s more potent than ever, the drug that has killed famous rock stars and everyday Americans alike is making headlines again. “Heroin has this sort of dark allure to it that’s part of its mystique,” said Eric Schneider, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania who wrote the book “Smack: Heroin in the City,” a historical account of the drug. “What I’ve heard from heroin users is that flirting with addiction is part of the allure: to sort of see how close to that edge you can get and still pull back.”

“People think that it is someone who is a bum, who’s homeless, who has no money and who is sort of living at the very bottom,” said Michael Clune, a former addict who wrote the memoir “White Out: The Secret Life of Heroin.” ‘’When the truth is, it really is everywhere.” The number of recorded heroin overdose deaths nearly doubled from 1,842 in 2000 to 3,036 in 2010, according to the most recent statistics available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Heroin deaths still account for a relatively small percentage of total drug overdose deaths: less than 10 percent in 2010, for example. A drug that was once largely confined to major cities is spreading into suburban and rural towns across America, where it is used predominantly by young adults between the ages of 18 and 29, said Jim Hall, an epidemiologist who studies substance abuse at Nova Southeastern University in Florida.

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